​​​​​​​BBBEE LEVEL 1 [ONE]  

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HOW TO USE A ROLLER AND BRUSH?

ROLLER

A roller saves time, it may require more utensils (roller/handles) than brushes but it can get more done in less time. Always strive for an overlapping “W” to get better coverage and smooth out roller lines.


FIRST, DAMPEN THE ROLLER: Use a thinner for oil-based paint and tap water for latex. Roll off any excess. Fill the tray about halfway and lower the roller into the middle of the tray. Roll up and down the slope of the pan to saturate the roller and roll off any excess. Be careful not to overload the roller to avoid drips, runs and spatter. Fill the tray about halfway and lower the roller into the middle of the tray. Roll up and down the slope of the pan to saturate the roller and roll off any excess. Be careful not to overload the roller to avoid spatter, drips, and runs.


START WITH THE TOP HALF OF THE WALL: So the drips fall on unpainted areas. Dip the roller about halfway into the paint. Move the roller along the grid until the sleeves are nicely saturated but not dripping.


WORK IN SMALL ZONES: Two to three square feet at a time—and pay attention to the roller. It should sound wet. When the roller loses that moist sound, it’s time to load more paint on to your roller.


For all types of rooms, it is recommended to use two coats, no matter what the paint label says. Dark shades, such as dark green navy, may need two or three for full coverage.

BRUSH

Dip the brush into the paint, inserting no more than two-thirds of the bristles. Move the brush around a bit to saturate it with paint. Pull the brush up and let the excess paint drip off —avoid overloading because it leads to drips, runs and spatter, even with the best paint. You can remove the excess paint by wiping the bristles against the edge of the paint container.

 

POUR A QUARTER OF PAINT INTO A PAINT TRAY: This is your working paint that will move around the job with you. For more perfection, don’t dip directly from the container but from your working tray.

 

PREPARE THE EDGES: If the boards you’re painting butt against a different paint color or a wall, you can lay a line of painter's tape against the edge, pushing it down tight against the surface to prevent the wet paint from bleeding underneath the tape.

 

START AT THE TOP OF THE WALL WITH THE LOADED BRUSH AND STROKE DOWN TOWARD THE MIDDLE: The paint should flow smoothly onto the surface with slight effort on your part. When the brush starts to drag, stop and reload.

 

MAKE LONG STROKES: Do not dab small areas as this leaves marks in the paint. The brush will leave a track of parallel ridges, but they’ll lie down before the paint begins to skin over.

 

CLEANING PAINT BRUSHES

  • If you used water based paint, remove the excess paint in a bucket or container while the paint is still wet. It is much more difficult to remove dried paint with soap and water. If necessary, use a brush comb to remove it. Wash off the remaining paint under running water.

 

  • To remove extra paint, scrape the tool thoroughly or wipe it across newspaper or cardboard.

 

  • Oil-based paint should be removed in a container with thinners, rinsed in tap water and then washed with soapy water. Rinse the brush until the water runs clear

 

For all types of rooms, it is recommended to use two coats, no matter what the paint label says. Dark shades, such as dark green navy, may need two or three for full coverage.